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Rome: la ripresa

In September, after the long, hot summer, life in Rome supposedly returns to its usual work/school routine, doctor’s appointments and whatnot. La ripresa. Not that anyone is really going back to what was before. 

La ripresa could also refer to an economic upturn. Again, dubious.

Today’s photography theme was la ripresa, working around the stalls in Campo de’ Fiori, which was hardly bustling.

At least in one sense it was a ripresa: my own personal one of going around the city with my camera again, for the first time in months. I felt a bit rusty, not unlike the wrinkled tomatoes with a touch of mould in the basket in front of an empty restaurant. 

the ripresa season’s imperfect greetings

In the background, the fairies were doing their best to keep up appearances.

Campo de’ Fiori fairy lights in the daytime

Some restaurants had a more sombre look, perhaps hoping their good name would bring their customers back.

Fortunata? (Lucky?)

Every little corner in this area has a rich history, and hidden treasures.

writing on the wall at Piazza del Biscione

Down at the other end of Camp de’ Fiori, off the via del Pellegrino, is the picturesque Arco degli Acetari, with one of the most photographed courtyards in Rome.

courtyard, Arco degli Acetari
doorway, Arco degli Acetari
a local resident, Arci degli Acetari courtyard

Although the waiters’ and salespeople’s masks made their words mostly inaudible to me, they seemed very keen to get the ripresa going. It’s not that I’m difficult to please, but I’d already done my fruit & veg shopping, don’t enjoy the taste of pomegranate juice, was not tempted by the menù veloce. If it had been evening, and one of the comfy and spacious front row seats available, I might have stopped here for a prosecco, for old times’ sake.

menù veloce – fond memories of prosecco evenings

As it was, after 3 hours, 2 coffees and a few short conversations with a dozen or so strangers, I was already exhausted – a fairly typical side effect of the September ripresa.

It felt like nighttime already. I followed the pink flamingo’s example, donned my mask and headed for home in the rain.

wear your mask


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Pepper #1

Going to the shops for groceries these past couple of months has been a slow process at times. The upside is that in the long wait, some interesting things have caught my eye. I found this lovely item in the dark depths of a tiny grocery shop nearby, and once home, I positioned it with care in the late afternoon sun.

My Facebook people weren’t overly impressed:

Daughter: What the hell is that? (😂😂)

Sister: A misshapen pepper? (👍🏻)

Brother: A pepperwrongi (😂😂)

Friend: I thought it was a puppy (😲)

Daughter: It looked like a person from here (😂)

Me: It’s me, how I felt today 😜😂 (🤣🤣🤣)

Daughter: Well who hasn’t felt like a misshapen pepperwrongi puppy person sometime in their life! (😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 😂 👍🏻👍🏻👍🏻)

 

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Yes, I was thinking of Edward Weston here


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Rose in a glass of water on my kitchen table

Not a great time for landscape trips, but a good enough time for other things.

 

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Yes, I was thinking of Josef Sudek here.


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A peek from the roadside

My three days in Ballintoy sped by, leaving no time to explore the beaches further along the coast. Just a sneak peek from the roadside…

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My last morning in Ballintoy

Last for now, that is.

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Evening #2 at Giant’s Causeway

a few hours later…

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Afternoon at Giant’s Causeway

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Evening #1 at Giant’s Causeway

You can’t come here without wondering about Fionn mac Cumhaill at some point. For some he’s just a legend. For others he is legend, and is still around here somewhere, sleeping, waiting.

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A waterfall somewhere in Northern Ireland

It was a short walk from the road, and not a long drive from Dunluce Castle, but the name of the place escapes me. The rocks were slippery and I was hobbling around in pain with a recent injury so didn’t venture further downstream where the more exciting views were to be had.

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Old Man of Dunluce

There was an Old Man of Dunluce,
Who went out to sea on a goose:
When he’d gone out a mile,
He observ’d with a smile,
“It is time to return to Dunluce.”

Edward Lear, More Nonsense, Pictures, Rhymes, Botany, Etc. (1872), limerick 12

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Falling trees

If I’d got to the Dark Hedges pre-dawn as intended, they might have appeared as dark as their name suggests. But the light-coloured beech trunks and even just a hint of morning sunshine made this tunnel of trees a fairly light and airy one, not spooky at all.

Spookier is the fact that the number of trees has practically halved since they were first planted in the late 18th century, some through storm damage, but also as the flux of visitors has intensified. 

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Bring a wool jumper

Early one morning looking out from Ballintoy towards Sheep Island, I wondered how the island got its name, since it has no sheep, and doesn’t look like a sheep, but apparently has a lot of cormorants and other seabirds. Mind you, as for everywhere else around here, a nice wool jumper would definitely come in handy if you were ever to go there (unlikely, since it’s uninhabited, and a Special Protection Area), even in summer.

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Sheep Island in front, Rathlin Island in the distance

The Seabird Centre at Rathlin West Lighthouse, whose light flickers in the distance, has plenty of birds too, including the tiny puffins that people love to photograph. But the puffins had all gone by August. The tourists and seagulls certainly hadn’t.

But back at the port it proved fairly easy to find a quiet place for a restorative cup of tea (or was it a late afternoon gin?) and an even quieter spot a short walk away to enjoy the peculiar mix of sunshine and ominous clouds to be had around these parts. Far too hot for a wool jumper on Rathlin Island that day, while we heard that it lashed buckets in Ballintoy all day.

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On Rathlin Island


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First impressions

Who said you have to suffer for your art?

No more backpack-laden uphill hikes pre-sunrise for me. I’ve had it up to here with standing around in loch-side mud getting chewed by midges. It has finally dawned on me that I’m no longer interested in putting up with endless hours in the rain and howling winds without sleep, food, relaxation or wine in the name of landscape photography. Same goes for the effort involved in trying to keep up with the exaggerated strides of blokes 2 metres tall, each with 3 cameras, 10 lenses and 2 tripods in their backpacks, as on The day I landed on Mars.

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Landscape photography tours and workshops can be wonderfully inspiring thanks to the places you visit and the input and feedback provided by the workshop leader. The people you meet and exchange information, views and ideas with can also make all the difference. But do we need to experience extremes or push ourselves to physical limits in order to create interesting images? 

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These were my thoughts when I came across an “impressionist photography” workshop in Giverny arranged in summer 2019 by photography workshop leader Cheryl Hamer. It sounded just what I wanted: a peaceful rural location, a small group, no early morning rises, no long hikes to extreme locations in wild climatic conditions. Just an unexplored photographic technique for me to learn about and practise (multiple exposures with an impressionist effect). Plus I love French food, wine, the sounds of the French language, and Monet’s water lily paintings. 

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In the stunning setting of Monet’s garden at Giverny, Cheryl’s clear input and supportive feedback, both of which came in just the right doses at the right time, provided plenty of opportunities for creating images in Monet’s garden. The fact that this particular group turned out to be made up of lovely, friendly people with a sense of humour who also appreciated pain-free photography in a relaxing environment was an unexpected bonus.

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Not that I’ll be giving away my midge net, wellies or rainproofs yet though: Northern Ireland is my next stop.


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The icing on the cake

The high spot of the trip was the frozen Pericnik Waterfall. Brrrr…

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A fair bit of puffing and panting took place on the way up in the snow, but I’d do it again any day… with a lighter backpack 😜

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Medieval church at Lake Bohinj

The picturesque Church of Saint John the Baptist at Lake Bohinj.

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Evening at Lake Bohinj

Yes it’s a peaceful view, but this a popular corner at Lake Bohinj, even on cold and cloudy winter evenings. The view to my right had a dozen people or more milling around admiring the ducks. To my left, this. As I set up the shot, knees buried in the snow, I could hear people approaching behind me, making their way towards the hut and pier in this scene. Peace doesn’t last.

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Winter sunset

Even standing more or less still for a couple of hours or more in sub-zero temperatures, somehow you just don’t feel the cold.

The touch of warm colour in the sky as sunset approached probably helped.

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I went back to Bled

And once again the snow melted.

But not before I’d had the time to take this shot:


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Bubble rapt

Lucca was lovely. A short walk to our B&B around the corner from the amphitheatre and we were ready to have a wander through the town within the walls. Concerts, exhibitions, eating and drinking places galore… this tiny town seemed to have more than enough for our short stop here.

We turned another corner… bubbles everywhere.

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The pied bubble maker of Lucca was at work…

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calling the children to play…

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The next day the area was deserted and the children gone, as were the pied bubble maker and his bubbles, leaving grey sudsy slabs and greenish puddles behind.

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A night in Pisa

After the day’s walkabout, a stroll around the tower area in the evening was the most likely choice, even if it meant coping with crowds. But as it turned out, not noticing them was easier than I’d hoped.

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back across the Arno to our hotel

 


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Pisa walkabout

We had plumped for a morning walk, but the tower area was teeming with tourists. The city walls seeming like a decent alternative.

On that quiet and sunny autumn morning, we came upon 3 or 4 other people in as many hours, and ended up in a still and silent residential district.

A tiny sample of views to be had:

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The leaning trees of Pisa

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And my favourite autumn image so far this year:

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Lanzarote winter sunset #2

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Lanzarote winter sunset #1

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A change in the weather

Now that I know what winter weather can be like in Lanzarote, and know the places I’d like to spend more time in, I’m pretty sure I will go again, but not among the crowds in the baking summer sun.

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